Thursday, January 16, 2014

Fujian, Guangdong, Zhejiang Provinces Report New H7N9 Cases

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Our morning roundup of newly reported H7N9 cases numbers six  from three provinces.  Although it is now Thursday evening in China, it is always possible we’ll see more before the day is out.

 

Our first stop, is Fujian Province, where two cases have been reported in the past 24 hours, making four cases so far in 2014.

 

Fujian Province, one case of human infection with the H7N9 new bird flu cases

2014-01-15

Health and Family Planning Commission of Fujian Province January 15 briefing, the province 15 Nisshin confirmed one case of human infection with the H7N9 avian flu, the patient had a certain, male, 30 years old, currently residing in Quanzhou Nanan, engaged in stone processing, is currently in critical condition compared, In Quanzhou, a hospital for treatment. (Emergency Management Office)

Fujian Province, one case of human infection with the H7N9 new bird flu cases

Time :2014 -01-16 

Health and Family Planning Commission of Fujian Province on the 16th Bulletin, 16 Nisshin province confirmed one case of human infection with the H7N9 avian influenza. Patients Xu Moumou, male, 60 years old, self-employed businessmen, now living in Quanzhou Luojiang present serious condition, a hospital in Quanzhou, isolation and treatment. (Emergency Management Office)

 

Our next stop is Guangdong Province, adjacent to Hong Kong, where two new cases (1 fatal) have been reported as well. A second death, that of an earlier announced case is reported as well.

 

Province added two cases of human infection with H7N9 bird flu

2014-01-16 17:55:18 Ministry of Health and Family Planning Commission

Health and Family Planning Commission of Guangdong Province on January 16 briefing, the province confirmed two cases of human infection with the H7N9 avian influenza.

Case 1 Fumou, male, 59 years old, retired, currently residing in Haizhu District of Guangzhou. January 16 confirmed cases of human infection of H7N9 avian influenza, is currently in a stable condition in Guangzhou City, the designated hospital admission.

Case 2 0000 A, F, 76 years old, retired people, now living Foshan. January 16 confirmed cases of human infection of H7N9 avian influenza, is currently in critical condition, in Foshan City, the designated hospital admission.


Also, one case of human infection with the H7N9 avian flu Yangjiang January 6 reported died due to respiratory and circulatory failure, on at 23:10 on January 15 death.

 

And our last stop is Zhejiang Province, which for the 8th day running, has also reported new cases.

 

Zhejiang Province, two cases of human infection with the H7N9 new bird flu cases

Source: Ministry of Health and Family Planning Commission
January 16, 2014

Zhejiang Provincial Health and Family Planning Commission January 16 briefing, the province confirmed two cases of human infection with the new H7N9 avian influenza.


1, the patient Tan Moumou, female, 20 years old, farmer, now living in Hangzhou Xiaoshan District. January 15 confirmed human cases of avian influenza H7N9 infection. Now is critical, in Hangzhou, a hospital for treatment.

2, patients Qiu Moumou, male, 58 years old, farmers, Zhejiang Jiaojiang people. January 16 confirmed human cases of avian influenza H7N9 infection. Now is critically ill in a hospital in Taizhou treatment.

 

For the most complete listing of reported H7N9 cases, I heartily recommend FluTrackers H7N9 Case List, which contains live links to reports for each case listed.

 

While we continue to see sporadic (and for the most part, widely scattered) cases of H7N9 popping up in Eastern China, thus far we’ve seen no epidemiological evidence of sustained or efficient human-to-human transmission.  

 

There are, however, many unanswered questions regarding how this virus is transmitting to humans, and the incidence of mild or asymptomatic cases is largely unknown.

 

A few small family clusters have been reported, and laboratory testing suggests this virus is better adapted to mammals than other avian viruses we’ve seen (see mBio: H7N9 Naturally Adapted For Efficient Growth in Human Lung Tissue), so the concern remains that given enough time and opportunities, H7N9 could better adapt to human physiology.

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